when can a baby cry to sleep

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Pediatric experts recommend infants always sleep on their backs to avoid SIDS

when can a baby cry to sleep ⭐️how to when can a baby cry to sleep for From the WebMD Archives

By Amy Norton

HealthDay Reporter

MONDAY, Aug. 21, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Despite years of public health campaigns, many American parents are still putting their babies to sleep in an unsafe position, a new study finds.

The study found that just half of mothers surveyed said they always put their babies to sleep on their backs.

Experts called the findings "" since back-sleeping has long been promoted as a key way to cut the risk of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS).

In 1994, the U.S. government launched the "" campaign to encourage parents to put their babies to sleep lying face-up. That came after research identified tummy-sleeping as a major risk factor for SIDS.

when can a baby cry to sleep ☑how to when can a baby cry to sleep for Researchers believe SIDS is related to for 1 last update 2020/10/27 problems in the brain regions that control breathing and arousal from sleep.Researchers believe SIDS is related to problems in the brain regions that control breathing and arousal from sleep.

There is no way to tell which infants are vulnerable -- so back-sleeping is the safest position for all babies in the first year of life, explained Dr. Michael Goodstein, a neonatologist at York Hospital in York, Pa.

In fact, he said, the U.S. SIDS rate fell by over 50 percent in the decade after "" began.

when can a baby cry to sleep ☑how to when can a baby cry to sleep for "" Goodstein said.

Yet, it has long been known that some parents still favor tummy-sleeping. There the 1 last update 2020/10/27 is even evidence that rates of back-sleeping are declining among black families, according to Goodstein.Yet, it has long been known that some parents still favor tummy-sleeping. There is even evidence that rates of back-sleeping are declining among black families, according to Goodstein.

So he said he was not surprised by the new findings. "" he added. ""

Goodstein cowrote an editorial published with the study in the Aug. 21 issue of Pediatrics online.

The findings come from a nationally representative survey of 3,300 U.S. mothers with babies between the ages of 2 and 6 months.

Overall, 77 percent said they "" put their babies on their backs to sleep. But only 49 percent said they always did.

when can a baby cry to sleep 👍how to when can a baby cry to sleep for That'' lives were important. When moms said the people close to them supported tummy-sleeping, for instance, they were almost 12 times more likely to do it.

That points to a need for widespread education, said Dr. Eve Colson, the lead researcher on the study.

"" said Colson, a professor of pediatrics at Yale School of Medicine. ""

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